Injera

Injera is a fermented Ethiopian bread made with naturally gluten-free teff flour. The finished flatbreads have a spongy texture and a somewhat sour flavor that is loved!

Serves: 10Hands-on: 1 hourTotal: 11 hoursDifficulty: Medium

Serves: 10

Ingredients

  • 2 cups teff flour
  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 5 cups lukewarm water

Directions

  • In a large bowl, whisk together the teff flour, all-purpose flour, and salt. Add the water and stir until well mixed. Cover with a tea towel and allow to sit for 8–10 hours, or overnight. After 8–10 hours there should already be some liquid risen to the top and bubbles appearing. Stir gently with a wooden spoon. Replace tea towel and allow mixture to continue to sit at room temperature for 2–3 more days, stirring once a day with the wooden spoon.
  • When the batter is ready it will be quite bubbly and will have a sour aroma. Stir the batter well to mix in any liquid that may have separated. The consistency of the batter should be thin enough to run off your fingers quickly but still leave a thin coating.
  • Heat a nonstick or lightly oiled, 10"–12" heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Pour ⅓–½ cup batter into the pan and immediately swirl the pan so a thin layer of batter coats the entire flat cooking area of the pan. Cook one side only, until the edges of the injera pull away from the pan and the surface is covered with bubbles. Remove from pan without cooking the other side. Wipe out pan with a paper towel between each injera and re-oil pan if not nonstick. Allow injera to cool completely. Place foil between injeras as they are stacked to prevent them from sticking together.

Recipe Information

Serves: 10

Ingredients

  • 2 cups teff flour
  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 5 cups lukewarm water

Directions

  • In a large bowl, whisk together the teff flour, all-purpose flour, and salt. Add the water and stir until well mixed. Cover with a tea towel and allow to sit for 8–10 hours, or overnight. After 8–10 hours there should already be some liquid risen to the top and bubbles appearing. Stir gently with a wooden spoon. Replace tea towel and allow mixture to continue to sit at room temperature for 2–3 more days, stirring once a day with the wooden spoon.
  • When the batter is ready it will be quite bubbly and will have a sour aroma. Stir the batter well to mix in any liquid that may have separated. The consistency of the batter should be thin enough to run off your fingers quickly but still leave a thin coating.
  • Heat a nonstick or lightly oiled, 10"–12" heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Pour ⅓–½ cup batter into the pan and immediately swirl the pan so a thin layer of batter coats the entire flat cooking area of the pan. Cook one side only, until the edges of the injera pull away from the pan and the surface is covered with bubbles. Remove from pan without cooking the other side. Wipe out pan with a paper towel between each injera and re-oil pan if not nonstick. Allow injera to cool completely. Place foil between injeras as they are stacked to prevent them from sticking together.

Nutrition Information

Nutrition Information
Amount per serving
Calories210
Total Fat2g
Saturated Fat0g
Cholesterol0mg
Sodium125mg
Total Carbohydrate42g
Dietary Fiber5g
Sugars0g
Protein7g